Electrical Submersible Pump

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Brief

Electrical Submersible Pump (ESP) is an artificial lift method to lift fluids from the wells.

Electrical Submersible Pumps are used to pump off the oil wells and produce water from the water source wells.

A typical submersible pumping unit consists of an electric motor, a seal section, an intake section, a multistage centrifugal pump, an electrical cable, a surface-installed switchboard, a junction box, and transformers [1].

750+ ESP models are grouped into the ESP catalog.

ESP Performance Curves

The performance curves of ESP represent the relationship between flow rate capacity and:

  • Head capacity
  • Pump efficiency
  • Brake Horsepower

ESP Performance Curves also show Best Efficiency Point (BEP) and ESP operating range.

ESP Performance Curves are used for ESP design and sizing.

These curves are for a fixed power cycle i.e. 50Hz, and can be changed with variable frequency controllers.

Reda GN5200 ESP Performance Curves

REDA GN5200 ESP Performance Curves for 150 stages - 60 Hz

ESP Tornado chart

ESP Tornado chart is the variable-speed ESP performance chart showing the ESP performance curves at different frequencies.

Tornado chart for the REDA DN3100 pump with 400 stages

ESP Tornado chart for the REDA DN3100 pump with 400 stages

ESP System

ESP Motor

ESP Motor: Centrilift motor 375MSP 18hp/520V/26A

ESP Motor: Centrilift motor 375MSP 18hp/520V/26A

ESP Cable

ESP Cable: #1 AWG CPNR Centrilift 34.5/-/2.51kg/m SOL 5kV

ESP Cable: #1 AWG CPNR Centrilift 34.5/-/2.51kg/m SOL 5kV

ESP Drive

ESP Drive

ESP Drive

ESP Design Software

  • Pump Design - ESP pump design software available online at www.pengtools.com.
  • Subpump
  • Autograph PC
  • Pipesim ESP design
  • DesignRite
  • WellFlow
  • Prosper
  • SelPro
  • RosPump
  • Автотехнолог

See also

ESP catalog
ESP Tornado chart

References

  1. Brown, Kermit (1984). The Technology of Artificial Lift Methods. Volume 4. Production Optimization of Oil and Gas Wells by Nodal System Analysis. Tulsa, Oklahoma: PennWellBookss.